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Our reach for the stars.

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Our reach for the stars.

Post  timex on Thu Oct 11, 2012 7:09 am

Not about UFO's.
Our reach for the stars.

Enjoy!
tim


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Nasa is touting their new Solid Rocket Motors for 2017, are the largest ever. FALSE.
For the past 50-YEARS sitting in Miami- Dade, in an abandoned underground silo, is the AEROJET Sl-3 MOTOR, developed 5.9-million pounds of thrust, in 1967, and is sitting there, to this day.

When NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) enters service in 2017, it will replace the historic Saturn V as the largest, most powerful space launch vehicle ever flown. To lift its initial 70-metric ton (77 ton) payload into orbit, the SLS will rely on additional boost from a pair of the largest solid rocket motors ever to be built for flight. The first of these boosters is being assembled for NASA in Brigham City, Utah by ATK Space Systems using new manufacturing methods intended to make these behemoths safer and less expensive.Like the Shuttle’s, the SLS boosters are reusable, though they are much more powerful. Where a shuttle booster put out 2.8 million pounds of thrust (12,000 kN), and SLS booster reaches 3.6 million pounds (16,000 kN).

Since 1968, Aerojet-Dade,

Deepest Hole, ever dug in florida, Largest Solid Fuel Motor, ever produced.Still sits there, today.
The VIDEO LINK, shows the motor being tested, and interviews with people who worked there........................................................

http://vimeo.com/22954417

Credit Wikipedia for info on Aerojet General........ ............................
In the 1960s, Aerojet solid fuel technology was under consideration for use in Saturn first stages. A monolithic, 21-foot-diameter (6.4 m) motor was designed, which was too big to be transported by rail. A facility was constructed in the Florida Everglades where the motors could be built and tested, and then barged to Cape Canaveral. A canal was dug (C-111), the southernmost freshwater canal in Southeast Florida, and a drawbridge was installed for the U.S. Highway 1 crossing at mile marker 116. The canal was dubbed the "Aerojet Canal". SW 232nd Avenue was renamed "Aerojet Road".

When the Aerojet product was not selected for the Saturn project, and segmented boosters were chosen for the Space Shuttle, the land and facilities were returned to the state, and are now managed by the South Florida Water Management District and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission as a nature preserve. The Aerojet signage still remains for both the road and canal and most of the facility's buildings remain intact, although weather-damaged.......................................................




Aerojet acquired land for the plant, less than five miles from the Everglades National Park, paying $2.50 an acre per year for an annual lease with an option to buy up to 25,000 acres more at nickels on the dollar.

Between Sept. 25, 1965 and June 17, 1967, three static test firings were done. SL-1 was fired at night, and the flame was clearly visible from Miami 50km away, producing over 3 million pounds of thrust. SL-2 was fired with similar success and relatively uneventful. SL-3, the third and what would be the final test rocket, used a partially submerged nozzle and produced 2,670,000 kgf thrust, making it the largest solid-fuel rocket ever.

By the time, NASA had decided to go with liquid-fueled engines for the Apollo’s Saturn V rockets, causing the workers of the Everglades plant to be laid off and the abandonment of the facility. In 1986, after NASA had awarded the Space Shuttle booster contract to Morton Thiokol, Aerojet sued the State of Florida and sold most of it’s land holdings to the South Dade Land Corporation for $6 million. After many unsuccessful attempts to use the land for farming, the land was sold off again to the state of Florida for $12 million. Aerojet would later trade it’s remaining 5,100-acres in South Florida for 55,000 acres in New Mexico.

In early-2010, the district made plans to overhaul the damage done to the wetlands by the C-111 canal. The canal had been sucking water that once flowed into Florida Bay and piping it 20 miles the wrong way, ever since it was dug. The Aerojet Road, which ran 3 miles south of the facility to the test firing site, is now a nature trail and the future of the space relic remains unknown.

**********************************************************
P.S.
I still can't wrap my head around the fact, how much money was spent there, fire the motor 3 times, only to toss the keys to the state and say thanks but no thanks, it's yours, AND "the land and facilities were returned to the state, and are now managed by the South Florida Water Management District and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission as a nature preserve. "with no worry about whats leaking into the ground water from that place, is astounding.

tim

The rocket motor, today....
Inside the silo building.



The motor, today.
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timex

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Anyone else read about this?

Post  ***** on Thu Oct 11, 2012 5:48 pm

I found this very interesting. It still seems that this sort of technological breakthrough is decades away, but I think we have to start thinking in these terms if we will ever travel on an interstellar basis.

http://www.space.com/17628-warp-drive-possible-interstellar-spaceflight.html

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Re: Our reach for the stars.

Post  timex on Thu Oct 11, 2012 8:13 pm

Very interesting article.
Reminded me of the the Bubble used on the Soviet Torpedo.

would cause space-time to warp around the starship, creating a region of contracted space in front of it and expanded space behind. Meanwhile, the starship itself would stay inside a bubble of flat space-time that wasn't being warped at all.

Late 80's I attend a ASW-TSB, (Top Secret Briefing) in New London, CT.
1st day, about 20 of us are seated, officer walks into the room, turns out the lights, and we watch a short film, classified footage.

It was on the Soviet Nuclear Torpedo, VA-111. Traveling 250-knots, and vaporizing a square mile of sea.
When the lights went on, every single jaw, was hanging open.

Our torpedoes due about 55-knts, our subs, less than that.

250-knots is close to 300-mph, under water.
Super cavitation: the torpedo is, in effect, flying in a gas bubble created by outward deflection of water by its specially shaped nose cone and the expansion of gases from its engine. By keeping water from coming into contact with the surface of the body of the torpedo, drag is significantly reduced, allowing extremely high speeds.


tim
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