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I may have found something

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I may have found something

Post  Tzieth on Sun Nov 04, 2012 3:56 am

I was on a completely different topic on another forum when I realized this could easily relate back to Bigfoot.

This goes back to how every base science does it's own thing without corresponding with other sciences to get a bigger picture. In this case, the subject was "Death".

I tried to get a definitive answer on Decomposition of various animals... Long story short, there are none. For example, no one seems to actually know how long it takes for a deer to fully decompose, because no one is researching it. I am speaking of, sterile environments and not out in the wild where there are all kinds of factors.

The only thing I was able to come up with is that carnivores and carrion seem to decompose the fastest in the wild vs deer and elk.

Now what has been studied in all environments is Human decomposition. In a sterile environment, humans can take centuries to fully decompose. In a non sterile environment, it can take years depending on the climate. Animals and insects feed on us, and scatter our bones, but they can't seem to be able to destroy our bones.

If mother nature is "God", then we humans are the Devil... We do not follow the rules of nature, we instead oppose them. What I found which may be the kill-shot as to why we have not found bigfoot bodies is the exact thing that no one is mentioning.

Here are the loosely based stats:
Deer/Elk:Approximately 6-9 months for full decomposition.
Coyote:About 1 week for full decomposition (on the ground, not hung up on your fence)
Bear, Wolf, Cougar:Approximately 2 weeks-4 months depending on conditions.

The common denominator in this would be bacteria. Scavengers such as coyotes, coons, possums, Vultures and rats would actually be ingesting decomposer bacteria on a great scale.

Predators such as wolves, Bear, and Cougars would be incidentally ingesting the same bacteria. They can handle it. e coli and salmonella do not even phase them.

Ungulates such as deer and elk would not be ingesting it at all.

Humans do not ingest such bacteria as doing so can kill us. We have long since lost our immunity to basic decomposition bacteria. We cook our food, use antibacterial soap and wash our bodies regular. (errm most of us anyway.)

So when carnivores and scavengers die, they have that boost of internal decomposers going right to work. When we die, we only have the natural bacteria that we deem beneficial going to work on our dead bodies and it takes a while. In fact, when a human decomposes, it does not even have the same smell that an animal has.

Sasquatch have been reported to eat roadkill. Sasquatch have been reported to have an unbearable smell. (Which suggests that it is covered in bacteria.) Our arm pits and other places stink when we do not wash, due to a concentration of bacteria. In the case of most true Sasquatch (PNW type) the smells is described as musty and a cross between wet dog and bad human B.O.

In the case of Southern Skunkapes, it is said to smell like death itself. As if they either roll around in dead things, or as also suggested, they smear blood or fat into their hair/fur as mosquito repellent.

In both cases how long would something like that last when it dies?

Oh the other thing I found was something else no one is considering. Skeptics like to try and say that something the size of a Sasquatch could not find adequate food sources. (Despite the fact that bears do? lol) But they especially try to make this case for Southern Bigfoot type creatures. Going back to how humans defy the rules, there is a relict in our bodies, that no two doctors seem to agree on.. The Appendix.

When I had mine taken out at the age of ten, of course I asked "Don't I need that?" Two different doctors told me two different answers as to why I did not need it. The first said that it was once for storing food from back when humans were wild. The second told me, it was once for storing supplemental nutrients back when humans were wild and went on long hunts lol. If either is the case, I am Sure Sasquatches appendix is fully functional...
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Re: I may have found something

Post  Green911 on Sun Nov 04, 2012 8:23 am

Great info, definitely thought provoking.. Would love to see a study on the decomp rates.

elephant
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Hmmmm

Post  Blondie1 on Sun Nov 04, 2012 3:10 pm

Great info and food for thought. It's been reported that they also tear out the skunk glands and rub them all over themselves.

The appendix, hmmm, I was told when they did surgery that it was a very dirty structure and because I was having something else removed at the time there was a question whether they could remove it or not, however they did.

I just went here and read the whole page and found some fascinating information. At the bottom it shares some constructive ways the appendix is used in children who have other problems.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vermiform_appendix

Good topic Tz. Although I really think they may bury the bodies of their dead or at least cover them with leaves, grass/ weeds and such.


Just and FYI "The Body Farm" at UT is looking for a research assistant prof. if anyone is interested. I love these guys and have followed their research for several years.
http://fac.utk.edu/

Also here's where "The Body Farm" site is...Dr. Bass has done so much in this field. I follow a lot of Missing Children and Adults cases and have read about him and The Body Farm for a long time.
http://www.jeffersonbass.com/videos.html
The Forensic Anthropology Center is looking to hire a Research Assistant Professor. Click here to view the job description.
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Re: I may have found something

Post  GT3Paul on Fri Nov 09, 2012 1:46 am

I have a couple data points.
One: Monster Quest showed a Deer carcass on the forest floor in the south. It was gone in 2 weeks using time lapse photography
including the bones.
Two: Here were I live in the Mojave a carcass of an animal in the summer heat dries to just bones in no time like less than 7 days but
the bones stay and are easy to find IF the carcass hasnt been torn apart by coyotes which happes ALOT.
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Re: I may have found something

Post  Tzieth on Fri Nov 09, 2012 5:36 am

Yeah, the time lapses are all off. I was trying to find a specific time table for natural animal decomposition as we have documented for humans. But all I got was different answeres and a few time lapses. I know in my native Texas there are all kinds of variants. I remember stumbling on a dead dog out in the pasture with my friends once when I was 10 or 12. We took a stick to flip it over to look at the maggots and found none... Instead we found fireants all under it and crawling in and out of it. A few days later the dog was picked clean to the bone. There wasn't even any hide nor fur left and the vultures did not even bother to spread the bones as they were partially covered in a fireant mound.

In a wild environment I guess the decomposition rate depends on who gets to the corpse first. However now that I think about it, this does not make a strong case for Texas Bigfoot evidence. In a way fireants sort of preserve bones and once they claim a body, nothing is going to touch it... Unless they truly do bury their dead
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Re: I may have found something

Post  Green911 on Fri Nov 09, 2012 6:50 am

So, depending on the climate, weather, time of year, insects, forest litter, scavengers and predators, is what the decomp rates are dependent on. Not to mention the type of animal, it's weight, how much skin/fur/feathers, and type of bones.

Wow. I would hate to be the one to make up, or maintain that chart. We may never know what the rates are for Bigfoot, maybe not even be able to guesstimate.

elephant
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Re: I may have found something

Post  Tzieth on Mon Nov 12, 2012 1:47 pm

Green911 wrote:So, depending on the climate, weather, time of year, insects, forest litter, scavengers and predators, is what the decomp rates are dependent on. Not to mention the type of animal, it's weight, how much skin/fur/feathers, and type of bones.

Wow. I would hate to be the one to make up, or maintain that chart. We may never know what the rates are for Bigfoot, maybe not even be able to guesstimate.

elephant

They should find out lol. We do it with humans, but not animals. Put a deer in every environment, including sterile just to see how long it takes to breakdown without the aid of weather or insects
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